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 050: Archaeological Fieldwork in the ancient city of Petra

General Information

Petra


 

Petra prospered in the first centuries BC and AD and was the capital of the Nabatean Empire. It was a major trading route of incense, myrrh and spices connecting ancient Mesopotamia and Egypt. Petra was later annexed to the Roman Empire by Trajan in 106AD, until its abandonment in the early 8th century.


Petra is a fascinating and beautiful ancient city located in south western Jordan. The Nabateans buried their dead in intricate tombs -Bab Al Siq, Al Khazna, The Royals Tombs- which were cut out of the mountain sides. The city had also the temples -Qasr al-Bint, Great Temple, Ad Deir- a theatre, a colonnaded street and churches following the Roman annexation and later the Byzantine influence.


The Treasury (Al Khazna) is the most significant façade. It is almost 40 meters high and decorated with Corinthian capitals. The Treasury is crowned by a funerary urn constructed in the first century BC. The Monastery (Ad Deir) is one of the largest monuments in Petra and was used for the meetings of religious associations. The Monastery dates to the early 2nd century AD.

 
Petra is an UNESCO world heritage site since 1985, and it was announced as one of the Seven Wonders of the World.

 

The Sanisera Archaeology Institute for International Field Schools has just been given the amazing opportunity to expand the Sanisera field school to Petra, Jordan. At the site of Hirbat Braq on collaboration with the Petra Archaeological Park (Petra Development & Tourism Region Authority) and Al-Hussein Bin Talal University (Petra College for Tourism & Archaeology).

The site Hirbat Braq is approximately located 2km to the south east of Petra and 1km to the south of the out skirts of the town Wadi Musa, its highest point is at 1338m and its lowest point is at 1316m above the sea level. Hirbat Braq covers an area of 1.5 hectares. Hirbat Braq has a important presence of ceramic from the occupation of the Nabataean Kingdom, Roman and Byzantine empires, dating from the 3rd century BC to the early 8th century AD. The many structural remains of the site include a temple in the middle of the site, numerous stone wall terraces and cisterns that have collapsed over the time. The study of this site will help us greatly to understand and reconstruct the human occupation and traffic on the outskirts of the Petra and the trade in the region.

 

 


The Treasury (Al Khazna) is a most significant façade in Petra

The Treasury (Al Khazna) is a most significant façade in Petra

The Great Temple in Petra

The Great Temple in Petra

Roman archictecture in Petra. A colonnaded street

Roman archictecture in Petra. A colonnaded street

The Qasr al-Bint Temple in Petra

The Qasr al-Bint Temple in Petra

A temple complex in Hirbat Braq (Petra)

A temple complex in Hirbat Braq (Petra)

The many structural decorated remains in Hirbat Braq (Petra)

The many structural decorated remains in Hirbat Braq (Petra)

The Wadi Mussa village in Petra

The Wadi Mussa village in Petra

The Sanisera students digging in the fieldschool

The Sanisera students digging in the fieldschool

 



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